The Tale of the two Brothers Anpu and Bata

Once there were two brethren, of one mother and one father; Anpu was the name of the elder, and Bata was the name of the younger. Now, as for Anpu he had a house, and he had a wife. But his little brother was to him as if he were a son; he it was who made for him his clothes; he it was who followed behind his oxen to the fields; he it was who did the ploughing; he it was who harvested the corn; he it was who did for him all the matters that were in the field. Behold, his younger brother grew to be an excellent worker, there was not his equal in the whole land; behold, the spirit of a god was in him.
Now after this the younger brother followed his oxen in his daily manner; and every evening he turned again to the house, laden with all the herbs of the field, with milk and with wood, and with all things of the field. And he put them down before his elder brother, who was sitting with his wife; and he drank and ate, and he lay down in his stable with the cattle. And at the dawn of day he took bread which he had baked, and laid it before his elder brother; and he took with him his bread to the field, and he drove his cattle to pasture in the fields. And as he walked behind his cattle, they said to him, "Good is the herbage which is in that place;" and he listened to all that they said, and he took them to the good place which they desired. And the cattle which were before him became exceeding excellent, and they multiplied greatly.


Anpu and Bata were the names of two gods. Anpu, Anubis, was the God of mummification etc in jackal shape. Bata was an Upper Eyptian bull deity.
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Anpu he had a house: Having a house of one's own was a prerequisite for getting married and raising a family.
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as if he were a son: The two brothers were seemingly orphaned of both parents. Older brothers often took in younger unmarried siblings, but also other relatives in need.
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made for him his clothes: The making of clothes was not exclusively a female occupation, cf. the production of linen.
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there was not his equal: a frequently used expression in autobiographic inscriptions, probably more justified in the case of Bata than would have been usual. The absence of any mention of servants in the affluent household of Anpu is surprising. It seems Bata had to do most of the work all by himself.
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milk: milk production of Egyptian cows was rather low above all when the cows were doing the ploughing as well as happened when a farmer was too poor to own more than a cow. Anpu was quite well off, possessing oxen to do the heavy work.
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wood: wood, be it firewood or timber used for construction was ha